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Boarders in leadership positions

An Ascham education focuses on developing leadership in our girls, and encourages them to participate in multifarious activities. We believe a strong balance of work and play is the best combination for a wholistic education.

Alexis (Lexi) Campbell hails from the town of Warren, which lies 128kms northwest of Dubbo and 536kms northwest of Sydney. Lexi has been boarding at Ascham since Year 7, and two of her older sisters also boarded at Ascham. Lexi is one of our Year 12 boarders recently appointed to Senior leadership roles; in Lexi’s case, several roles: she is Ascham’s Head of Boarding, Captain of Equestrian and Captain of Touch Football. Lexi shares with us her experiences of boarding, her active participation in various sports, and her experience as a leading student at Ascham.

How do you see your role as Head of Boarding, and what do you hope to achieve?

I’m very excited about this role as it is an opportunity to improve the lives of everybody in the boarding school. I’ll be working closely with the Boarders’ Committee to implement fun new ideas and strengthen old traditions for ‘Nights In’, weekend activities, themed dinners, dances and more. I’ll also try to implement any ideas that the younger boarders share with me.

As a long-term boarder, what do you think are the main benefits of living in boarding?

When I first came to boarding in Year 7, I never imagined all the things it would teach me. The benefits are countless as boarding helps in all areas of life. It develops independence in each and every girl, it helps with homework as there is always someone around to ask for advice, it’s great to be a part of a smaller School community that is very supportive—and overall it’s really fun.

As a Sports Captain, how do you motivate your team members?

I think it’s important to remind them that every member of the team is valued, no matter their level of skill or confidence. I find that when girls know they have something to contribute to the team, they are more motivated to participate in training and try their hardest in competitions.

When did you first become involved in Equestrian events?

My family has always had a passion for horses, therefore I’ve been riding for as long as I can remember. My sisters and I always rode for our local pony club in Nevertire. I started competing for Ascham in 2012 when I was in Year 7. I am very lucky to have such supportive parents and an amazing aunty who have taught me everything I know about horses and who take care of my horse while I am at School.

What’s your favourite Equestrian sporting moment?

There are too many! One of the most recent was at the North West Equestrian Expo earlier this year. My horse Bobby Fisher and I competed in Showjumping at our highest level to date; I was really proud of how he performed and how I rode.

Will you continue competing in Equestrian events after you leave School?

Definitely—and hopefully long after I leave School. The oldest member of the Australian Olympic team this year was a 61-year-old dressage rider. I’m not sure I’ll be competing to the same level as her but I think it proves that being good at Equestrian has no age limit. There is always something to improve upon in riding, even if it takes your whole life to learn it.

When did you start playing Touch Football?

In Year 7. I’d never played it before and found it very difficult to pick up at first because of my lack of coordination and ball skills! Since then I’ve loved every team I’ve been in and found it an incredibly rewarding sport.

What do you enjoy most about this sport?

The team building process. Touch Football is all about teamwork: every year when I start in a new team I enjoy watching how everybody improves and comes together to become the best they can be. I enjoy getting to know my teammates and I always look forward to the time when we work seamlessly together.

Thank you, Lexi. We look forward to having your leadership at Ascham over the next 12 months, during your final year at School.



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